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Tinsmith Avenue For those seeking knowledge on past techniques used by yesteryears tinsmiths. The history of Tinsmith goes back in time farther then this place can travel, but for those who want to explore, please share your findings here.


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  #1  
Old 04-11-2017, 02:15 PM
bvaks bvaks is offline
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Default making flange by snipers

i saw tinsmith making a flange on a cup by some kind of hand snipers ?
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Old 04-12-2017, 06:41 AM
tinstructor tinstructor is offline
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Cool snipers ??

What kind of flange ? please describe it.
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Old 04-12-2017, 11:34 AM
bvaks bvaks is offline
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Default making flange using snipes

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Originally Posted by tinstructor View Post
What kind of flange ? please describe it.
hi a flange on cup body in order to attached bottom by double seam
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Old 04-12-2017, 08:10 PM
tinstructor tinstructor is offline
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Default snipers ??

If you mean snips when you say "snipers", I can't imagine how it could be done.
>Pliers can ,of course,make a flange sufficient to be covered by a double seam.
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Old 04-12-2017, 11:03 PM
bvaks bvaks is offline
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Default flange by snips

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Originally Posted by tinstructor View Post
If you mean snips when you say "snipers", I can't imagine how it could be done.
>Pliers can ,of course,make a flange sufficient to be covered by a double seam.
thank u.yes u are right but i saw it in youtube some traditional tinsmith doing it.
i am doing the flange by bead roller .however it is difficult for me to keep the item (a cup) round thanks
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Old 04-17-2017, 07:40 PM
tinstructor tinstructor is offline
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Default keeping it round...

Yes, a bead roller can do the job.I like a hand swadge machine. Both machines however can cause difficulty in keeping the object round, especially with small diameters,such as 3" and 4" round diameter.
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Old 04-19-2017, 01:24 AM
bvaks bvaks is offline
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hi thank u
i have a question concerning double seam in order to attaced buttom to round box body . i dont have a machine for that and i do it be anvil and hammer .the result is not flawless.do u have any suggestions thanks
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Old 04-22-2017, 03:27 PM
tinstructor tinstructor is offline
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I have answered this before.if you areen't opposed to soldering the bottom in separately, there is a near flawless way,as I tried to explain to you once before.

It will probably need a drawing of the seam and explanation to make it understandable.
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Old 05-07-2017, 03:21 PM
MattM MattM is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bvaks View Post
thank u.yes u are right but i saw it in youtube some traditional tinsmith doing it.
i am doing the flange by bead roller .however it is difficult for me to keep the item (a cup) round thanks
It's slightly elliptical when you roll it, because it is stretched out of material at a perpendicular angle. It will grow uneven especially around the double seam, so grow it from the center one way then double back to finish. If you're fitting a pipe inside the end of another pipe, like in a downspout drain, you add to the elliptical angle relative to the decrease in the top to bottom. Your pattern ends up like an arc shape.
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